The Egg Came First: How Grace Hyslop Cracked An Old Boys Club

Pioneering women in the world of American finance are most often known for their work on Wall Street. In the 19th century, Victoria Woodhull opened the first woman-owned Wall Street brokerage firm; about a century later, in the 1960s, Isabel Benham became the first female partner at a Wall Street bond house while Muriel Siebert became the first woman to buy a seat on the New York Stock Exchange.

But a few years before Benham and Siebert made their ceiling-shattering moves, another woman broke into an old boys’ club of finance — not in New York, but in Chicago. In January 1961, Grace E. Hyslop became the first female member of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

Read more at The Alert Investor.

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When Paper Paralyzed Wall Street: Remembering the 1960s Paperwork Crisis

In the late 1960s, an unusual crisis struck Wall Street. The foe? Paper.

Daily trading volume on the New York Stock Exchange was soaring to new heights, with the average number of shares changing hands more than doubling in just three years. But in this era before automated systems and processing, the Street soon became overwhelmed.

Read more at The Alert Investor.

Q&A: Cheryl Y. Biron, CEO, One Horn Transportation

Cheryl Y. Biron helps frozen food, building materials and consumer goods make their way across the country every day, and she does it without leaving her home office. Biron runs One Horn Transportation, a transportation brokerage firm that acts as middle person — Biron pointedly does not say “middleman” — between companies looking to ship goods and the truckers who deliver the merchandise.

Read more at NorthJersey.com.

Q&A: Brett Diamond, CEO of Hudson Fiber Network

Brett Diamond says he was in the right place at the right time. The Long Island native and his business partner, Keith Muller, decided to start a telecommunications business in New Jersey just as high-frequency trading — lightning fast, computerized trading dependent on high-speed data lines — was taking off in the Garden State. Now the company boasts an international network, with an infrastructure consisting of its own fiber-optic cables in New Jersey and lines leased from carriers around the world.

But the success of the Paramus-based Hudson Fiber Network can be traced back to more than luck.

Read more at NorthJersey.com.

11 Random Things Parents Googled for Their Kids’ Homework

Britney Spears recently revealed she’s going to be taking math classes so she can keep up when her older son learns pre-Algebra … and it’s not just celebs like Spears who need some extra help when it comes to understanding their kids’ school work. Of course, most of us non-famous folk don’t go so far as to return to school just for that reason. (Way to go the extra mile, Brit!) Instead, we turn to everyone’s favorite resource: Google.

I asked parents to tell me what strange, perplexing homework question or issue forced them to seek guidance on the Internet and here’s how they responded.

Read more at Babble.com.

An Army Staff Sergeant Turned Businessman

Kyle Evans planned on a long career in the military, until a few sticks of dynamite put an end to that dream. The explosives, Evans remembered, “blew up directly under my feet” as he traveled by Humvee through Mosul, Iraq, in 2007.

The Army staff sergeant survived but sustained a traumatic brain injury that put an abrupt end to his deployment. He left Iraq and in 2010 retired from the military. Evans, a Virginia native, returned to civilian life with a purple heart medal—and grim career prospects. He took a low-paying job in Orlando working for the Department of Veterans Affairs, but he knew he wanted more. It was time for a new dream, one that meant going to college.

Read more at Yahoo.com.

Emoji Is the Fastest Growing Language in the U.K. (Really)

When it comes to modern technology, I consider myself sophisticated. Modern. Savvy. Hip. “With it.”

I stream movies, download music, text regularly, take selfies and #HashtagLikeItsGoingOutOfStyle.

But when it comes to one particular, tech-driven trend, I’ve realized I’m a Luddite — and an unrepentant one at that. I, drumroll please, don’t speak emojii.

I’ve been known to sprinkle smiley or sad faces here and there, but I use them sparingly and in conjunction with the good ol’ English language, not in place of it. It’s true that a picture can say a thousand words, but a centimeter-tall icon? Not so much.

Which is why I find recent news from across the pond profoundly disturbing.

Read more at Babble.com.